Category Archives: Community Announcements

Tiree Community Council News

It was another long meeting, but there was plenty to talk about: the linkspan closure, an upgrade to the airport embarkation equipment, and a green light to discuss the pros and cons of taking the Scarinish public toilets into community ownership. The month had been full of meetings to report back on.

We had met Kevin Hobbs, the chief executive of CMAL, the company that owns the ferry fleet and the Tiree pier on behalf of the Scottish government. It was a chance to hear from the horse’s mouth about the shipyard delays on the Clyde, which mean the two new ferries are seriously behind schedule.

The Tiree linkspan is being replaced in February/March 2020, and we have to be prepared for the fact that we won’t be able to get cars or lorries on or off the ferry at the Gott Bay pier for four weeks. There is an important meeting on Tuesday 4th December 4-7.30 pm in An Talla, where CalMac and CMAL staff will do their best to answer our questions. The Tiree Transport Forum will make sure the engineers are aware of the big dates in the Tiree calendar so they can work round them.

We also met Michael Bratcher, who oversees air services within Transport Scotland. The contract for the flights between Tiree and Glasgow is up for renewal next year, and airlines will again be bidding. Passenger numbers are reassuringly up, and it looks as though services will continue much the way they are. Something Michael particularly likes is the ‘flight banking’ system that Tiree operates. This means that a few flights can be cut in the winter months and then used at the times of year of our choice when it’s busy. One piece of news is that a new and heavier SAAB is coming into operation, one that the Tiree runways cannot cope with. So the only planes coming to Tiree from next year will be the Twin Otter and the Kingair ambulance plane.

I also met our three local Argyll and Bute councillors last week. They had flown out from Oban to the island for the day, and were delighted with the convenience of the flight. When I pointed out that the Council had agreed to cut the subsidy of this service drastically, they were absolutely sure that the Oban- Tiree flights would be safe. Let’s hope they’re proved right!

While they were there, I took the opportunity to ask them for a bigger grant for Tiree Community Council to allow us to get to mainland meetings. They absolutely supported this. Let’s hope they’re successful!

There has been a problem over the last year with access to the Twin Otter for people who need help to get into the aircraft. The Stairclimber equipment to lift passengers up the steps is not powerful enough. The community council has been lobbying HIAL, who run the Tiree airport, as well as Loganair, to get a more powerful version, and we are delighted that HIAL have now done precisely that.

Another issue we have been chewing away at for over a year is the block of land next to Pier View in Scarinish. This was provisionally sold by HIE to MacLeod Construction, but has now come back on the market.

Finally: toilets. Every year the council cuts come closer. What has sharpened our interest recently has been the closure by Highland Council – apparently the UK’s ‘largest provider of public toilets’ – of most of their councilrun toilets in a bid to save £500,000 a year. Argyll and Bute councillors discuss the same cut every year too. We have taken the view that the Scarinish toilets, which everyone agrees are completely essential, are vulnerable, and we would be better to open a dialogue now to see if the council would consider passing them into community ownership. Community toilets are becoming more common – there are good examples in Biggar, Arisaig and the Kyle of Lochalsh. Things are at an early stage, but we have started the ball rolling. Now we will wait to see what sort of deal the council will make the community.

Councillors Dr John Holliday, Robert Trythall and Ian Gillies attended. Apologies were received from Willie Angus MacLean and Alison Clark.

Tiree Community Development Trust News

Tiree Trust Logo

The Milton Harbour Project has been out to tender. We hope to announce the result in the next edition of An Tirisdeach and the proposed start date for the work is 1st April 2019.

The Trust has been conditionally awarded £131k from Visit Scotland’s Rural Tourism Infrastructure Fund towards upgrading beach access car parks and extending the car park at The Business Centre. This forms around 70% of the costs required and an application to LEADER is ongoing to make up the funding package. Funding has also been secured from SNH, The Windfall Fund and Tiree Community Business.

Youth Worker Willie MacKinnon attended a Duke of Edinburgh training session in Inveraray and Lochgilphead along with Lydia Macajova, in preparation for leading a group of Tiree children to gain a Silver Award.

A visit from Fergus Murray, Head of Economic Development for Argyll & Bute Council, was delayed in early November for the second time and is now likely to be rescheduled in the new year.

At the time of writing a meeting was due to take place on Wednesday 14th November with crofters who participate in the Croft Camping Scheme to review the scheme.

The Trust recently welcomed Ishbel Campbell as the new Gaelic Development Officer. Ishbel will work part time (17.5 hours per week) continuing the fantastic work that Donna MacLean carried out during her time with the Trust including regular Gaelic Bookbug, Stradagan and School Gaelic Club sessions. Ishbel has also started weekly Gaelic classes for adults –if anyone is interested in beginner or intermediate classes please contact Ishbel for more information.

After completing a Gaelic course through Sabhal Mor Ostaig, Ishbel then completed a post graduate diploma (Gaelic Immersion for Teachers) via Strathclyde University and currently works part time as a primary teacher at the school on Tiree.

Tiree Linkspan

On Monday 29th Oct Community Council, and Tiree Transport Forum, met Kevin Hobbs, CEO, Caledonian Maritime Assets Limited (CMAL), and Richie Morgan CMAL’s Health, Safety and Environmental Manager.

We had a very constructive meeting addressing many ferry issues,including an over view of CMAL’s role in ferry and port facility provision.

The main discussion concentrated on Tiree’s linkspan replacement. Kevin Hobbs has requested we publish this statement:-

“We are planning a project to replace the linkspans at Tiree and Coll Ferry Terminals. Funding is in place and our engineering team are finalising tender evaluations for the works, with a view to appointing a contractor in the near future. It is our intention to issue a formal update once a contractor is appointed and to consult with the communities in Tiree & Coll at meetings in December 2018, which we are in the process of arranging.

At the meetings CMAL & CalMac will discuss the timing of the construction project, the details of the replacement process and the alternative ferry services to be in place during the works.

While the programme has not been finalised, we anticipate that removal of the existing linkspan at Tiree and installation of a newly fabricated replacement will take place in spring 2020, and that the project will take around three to four weeks to complete. If we can reduce that timescale, we will, but it will depend upon various factors, such as prevailing weather and repair works that may need to be undertaken once the existing linkspan is removed.

We know that timing is critical to minimise disruption to the island and its connectivity. CMAL and CalMac are working together to ensure that the alternative ferry services can be maintained throughout the construction period.”

Community Council News

Ferries, this year’s Armistice Day service at the War Memorial, and seaweed harvesting were some of the subjects discussed at this month’s community council meeting.

This had been delayed by a week to accommodate an important session of the Tiree Transport Forum with senior CalMac management earlier in the day. There has been a lot of frustration with the company over the last six months, with the prolonged absence of the Clansman and complaints about the booking system, centred around the weekend of the 10k. David Gibson (Director of Service Delivery for the whole company), Robert Morrison (Head of Operations North) and Finlay MacRae (Area Operations Manager North) acknowledged that the DOS-based system running ticketing was over twenty years old. An attempt several years ago to replace it had ended in failure, and a new £20 million request for its replacement was on the desks of ministers in Edinburgh. A new system was at least two years off, and in the meantime, they recommended using the website to get information about sailings.

David has instigated a new integrated control centre, so that ferry disruptions can be handled centrally, and he promised the company would be quicker at getting a work-around for problems in future. Everyone acknowledged that the fleet, with an average age of over twenty years, was struggling to keep pace with demand, particularly after Road Equivalent Tariff boosted numbers of tourists visiting the islands.

The Tiree ferry linkspan is due to be replaced in the autumn of 2019. This will mean a month when no vehicles will be able to access the boat. This will present a serious challenge; fortunately, Coll will be going through the same process six months earlier, giving us a chance to learn from that exercise.

Another issue that came up was the uncertain ownership of the car park at the pier head. There have been issues over long term parking there, but no one seems to know which body has title to the ground, and no one is currently managing it.

Our annual request for a change for the Barra boat in summer from Wednesday back to Thursday is just not possible at the moment, although the launching of the two new ferries currently on the slipway at the moment might free up timetables eventually. These vessels, known as 801 and 802, are seriously behind schedule and over budget; we will be lucky to see them before winter service 2019-2020 and late summer service 2020 respectively.

Another issue, which Alan Millar brought up, was the November 11th service at the War Memorial. Since the 1920s, this has taken place on the Saturday afternoon. This year marks the centenary of Armistice Day, with the 11th falling on the Sunday itself. We discussed whether to change the service to the Sunday afternoon for this year only. Alan will discuss the matter with the leadership of both churches.

Phones boxes came up for discussion, too. An ambitious project by the community council to buy and renovate all but one of the public phone boxes on the island has ground to a halt after an enthusiastic start last year.

By good fortune, one of those attending the meeting had bought and renovated a phone box for his wife’s birthday. He knew from first hand how difficult and expensive it could be. One suggestion was to move all the boxes from their current locations, use the best parts from all of them to repair one or two that could then be positioned in the most useful places, selling some of the spare parts left over to finance the project. A group will meet soon to look at the problem afresh.

I took advantage of a recent visit to the Coll Homecoming to chat to some members of their Community Council. Their issues are the dreadful state of their roads, and the desire of many islanders for a door-to-door recyclables collection. Some of the ferry timetable changes they were seeking were diametrically opposed to ours.

Marine Scotland has sent Marine Bioplolymers, the company seeking permission to trawl for kelp around Tiree, back to the drawing board, to apply again area by area. We will keep a close eye on the situation.

Dr John Holliday, Robert Trythall, Ian Gillies and Alison Clark were in attendance. William Angus MacLean sent his apologies. Sadly, Andy Wright has stepped down from the council.

Tiree Community Council September Meeting

Kelp dredging around the island, a significant reduction in the support given by Argyll and Bute Council for the Tiree- Oban flight, and the state of houses at Pier View came up for discussion at amarathon two-and-a-half-hour session of Tiree Community Council, the first after a two-month summer recess.

A company called Marine Biopolymers has submitted plans to trawl for kelp around Tiree. Kelp beds are breeding grounds for small fish, and the fear is that removing them would cut the catch of the island’s fishing fleet. The beds also cushion the force of Atlantic storms on the coastline, and the worry is that trawling them could make erosion of our sandy beaches, already an issue,worse. There could be less storm-cast seaweed for crofters to use on their fields. The effects on seals, basking sharks and animals like dolphins are also unknown, having a possible knock-on effect on sea life tourism. And large quantities of discarded kelp ‘stems’ might wash up on the island’s shores as an unsightly and smelly mess. We will respond to Marine Scotland in the next week with a list of our concerns, having won an extension.
Argyll and Bute Council have decided to cut the annual subsidy for the Oban-Coll-Tiree air link by a quarter, from £735,000 to £525,000. The service is going out to tender early next year. The worry is that the sum won’t be enough to attract an operator, and the service could be cut to one day a week or even stop completely. The flights are particularly popular with patients going to Oban hospital, allowing them to return the same day. We were concerned that the figures had been hidden deep in the council budget report, and needed a lot of digging to find them. We will lobby hard to preserve this service, one of the achievements of the last community council.We also decided to ask Highlands and islands Airports to see if there was a better way for disabled passengers to access the Glasgow plane than the current Stairmaster.
The poor state of housing at ‘Tank Farm’was also raised. We will try to meet as many residents as we can to get a fuller picture, and then get back to West Highland Housing Association. We also decided to chase up Highlands and Islands Enterprise, who sold a plot of land next to Tank Farm to MacLeod Construction of Lochgilphead, over the heads of two island groups.
The next meeting of the council will be on 10 October. Alison Clark and Ian Gillies were co-opted for a two-year term. The next elections will be in 2020, when two seats will be up for grabs.
Dr John Holliday, William Angus MacLean, Robert Trythall and Andy Wright and twelve members of the public were in attendance.

Tiree’s Flag is Officially Unveiled

It was a historic moment for the island on the 8th of September. After months of hard work and consideration, Tiree’s official flag was unveiled to the public in the small hall of An Talla.
Despite some last minute arrangements and postponing due to the plane’s delay, it gave the weather adequate time to chase away the grey clouds and reveal bright sunny weather, perfect for what was in store. An Talla was bustling with both locals and visitors for the Ultra marathon, with a few of the runners popping in to witness the ceremony for themselves. Refreshments were provided during the greeting as the small hall filled with individuals, before Dr John Holliday opened the proceedings of the unveiling. He expressed the importance of flags, stating “Tiree needs a rallying point more than a lot of other places. One thing you can say about Tiree is that over the last century and a half, is that it is a place you have to leave, for one reason or another. There are over a million people of Tiree descent around the world and bringing all this Tiree primary together is quite a difficult thing and so I thought having a flag would be a good way of doing this. Many of these people who left have had two Gaelic words engraved on theirs hearts: dualchas meaning where you come from and the second one is cianalas which is a longing for home. ”
Tiree Community Council began the process of creating a flag for the island two years ago, in May 2016. A sub committee was formed and the competition was arranged earlier this year, in April. 261 entries were submitted to the contest, originating from as far as Canada, Switzerland and South Uist. “When they came in, in this big box, we spread them out on the tables in the Trust offices, we were completely overwhelmed. There were a lot of designs to choose from. Everybody in the flag committee chose a different design, and we didn’t agree at all. I thought at that stage “How are we ever going to whittle this down to one flag? If it hadn’t been for Lord Lyon, we would have struggled.” The committee set up a stall at the Agricultural Show in the summer, they flew four of the flags at the Business Centre in Crossapol for all to see so members of the public could vote by post and there was online voting as well. The committee made their best effort to create an open competition and choose a flag that would best represent the island for years to come, with 1,598 individuals voting.
In all methods of the voting, there was one clear winner. Donald Cameron from Scarinish was revealed as the contest winner with 56% of the vote. He used the stalks of barley to remind us that Tiree is the most fertile of all the Hebridean Islands, and create an orb to symbolise the ‘sunshine isle’.
Dr Holliday went on to explain that Angus MacPhail would be raising the Tiree flag at the ‘Best of the West’ festival in Inveraray and that the winners of the Ultramarathon would have a flag to keep wrapped around them upon crossing the finish line. “The flag is not just a physical flag – it is a design that I hope will be used on mugs, hoodies and tea towels. It is a community flag, it belongs to all of us. There is no copyright. Anyone can take it. The more we use it, the more it will become a part of the communities heritage.” There was mention that the committee desired to make the 2nd September Tiree’s flag day, and do something in celebration of the islands new symbol.
Donald Cameron said, “I’m very proud to win this honour. It’s an amazing thing to become part of the history of Tiree.” He thanked the individuals and groups that had taken part in the competition and added, “A great island deserves a great flag. Flags are really public symbols; it’s a symbol of who you think you are and it’s about what you want other people to think and know about you. It could be a slightly obscure reminder of the past, but its much stronger if it projects something about the island today that people don’t know very well. I picked a universally understood positive symbol like the sun. Tiree is one of the sunniest places in Britain, as you all know, and it’s this very particular sun that Tiree is also known as ‘Tir An Eorna’, land of the barley. The summer barley is a direct link to its past, it’s present and its future. I hope the people of Tiree take it to their heart and use it as much they like.”
The public were piped outside by David Buchan where Donald Cameron and his son raised the flag officially for the first time. Once back inside the hall, John Anderson blessed the flag from the Church of Scotland. Philip Tibbetts who came from the flag institute in London and offered his expertise was invited to speak. He apologised on behalf of his boss who sent his congratulations on the winning design and the island’s accumulation of an official flag. They were incredibly impressed with the vigorous and determined nature of the flags process.
Pat Boyd made a speech on behalf of HM lord Lieutenant of Argyll and Bute, giving thanks to everyone who got involved from the contest entries, to those who voted, to the winner. Rosemary Omand made a speech on behalf of the Tiree Association. This was followed up by a poem written and recited by Donald Meek, which can be viewed in both Gaelic and English on the flags website. Ishbel Campbell sang Am Falbhh Thu Leam a’ Rìbhinn Òig?, with encouragement for the crowd to join in. Ian Gillies explained how individuals could download the flag for anyone’s use and those who attended the event were treated to lapel badges.
The unveiling ended with John Holliday giving thanks; “I’d like to thank everyone who sent in designs. It was agonising to realise how much time people put in to make the designs. It’s a very brutal process to whittle them down to four, and then whittle them down to one. So to everyone who had the courage to put pen to paper, I would like to thank you.” He also gave thanks to other individuals and groups who supported both the project and the event including Will Wright, the Tiree Trust, the Show Committee, Lord Lyon and the Flag Committee before thanking everyone who attended the event. It was a heart-warming day for Tiree’s community. The flag is available for download from the website: http://tireeflag.com/

Tiree Community Council

On the hottest day of Tiree’s summer 21 hardy souls, in equatorial conditions,attended the June meeting.

The main topic was CalMac, and issues arising from the Clansman’ s extended dry docking and repairs.

CalMac:-

Angus Campbell formerly leader of Comhairle nan Eilean Siar,and Chairman of the newly formed CalMac Community Board (CB) ,held the floor for nigh on an hour and half. He outlined the role and function of the CB , its bi-monthly meetings with CallMac, his direct access to the Minister of Transport ,and attendance at two CalMac Board meetings/year. To understand the genesis of the CB, and its Remit, please go to:- https://www.calmac.co.uk/community-board

Having covered the CalMac issues that the CB was currently addressing he took Q’s from the floor. These were overwhelmingly directed at CalMac’s ‘not-fit-for-purpose’ reservation system, exacerbated by Gourock’s abysmal customer information service. Peripheral issues were (a) the lack of capital investment in ferries, (b) poor contingency planning, and (c) the poverty of response from both Humza Yousaf, then Minister of Transport ,and Robbie Drummond( CEO CalMac), to the Tiree ferry issues TCC had raised with them, at the outset of the Clansman’s protracted dry-docking.

It was decided that TCC would summarise these issues in a formal submission to the CB, to be raised /addressed at the next CB Board meeting with CalMac scheduled for the end of Aug . This would also be submitted to David Gibson, CalMac’s Director of Service Delivery, to respond to ,on CalMac’s yet to be arranged Tiree visit.

TCC expressed its gratitude to Angus Campbell for addressing the meeting, and offering detailed responses to all the questions raised .

Other Issues:-

On conclusion of this lengthy CalMac discussion, it was decided to press on with the balance of the Agenda. Due to the near universal, lack of responses from Loganair, Scottish Government, and A&B CC these were expeditiously dealt with, and rolled-over to the next TCC.

Upgrades in internet connectivity have progressed ,and cleaning issues re the Scarinish Public Toilets have been resolved.

Co-option:-

The meeting was advised that TCC has vacancies for 2 co-opted members and it is hoped that these would be filled in time for its next meeting (5th Sept ) Gratefuly, we emerged into glorious sunshine, and cool evening air .

Tiree Flag Finalists Chosen

The Tiree Flag Competition has four finalists. The month-long competition attracted an extraordinary 261 entries from as far afield as Canada, Switzerland and South Uist, as well as many from Glasgow and the island itself.

Some were sketched in crayon, some carefully hand-drawn, and some produced to the highest design standards. The quality was extremely high, with twenty or thirty exceptional designs.

The committee was led by the Lord Lyon, Scotland’s flag authority, and Philip Tibbetts from the Flag Institute, both experienced in community flag competitions. It went about its business in a methodical way, grouping the entries into groups.

Simple designs were favoured, and it was stressed that flags should be timeless: they should be as beautiful and relevant in a hundred years time as they are today. The commonest design was a variant of the Nordic cross, an off-centre cross used by Nordic countries such as Norway and Iceland, and more recently by Shetland, Orkney, Barra and South Uist. The second commonest design used stripes, often using blue, yellow and green, to symbolise the flat, fertile island and the long sandy beaches. Others used the shape of a wave, the sun, the corncrake and the Tiree black-roofed houses to convey the essence of the island.

The committee, which also included Dr John Holliday, Ian Gillies, Lachie Brown, Rosemary Omand, Donna MacLean and Annine MacLean argued over the merits of the different entries for four hours, before coming to a conclusion, although the debate continued over the finer details for over a week.

We hope to have the finalists’ designs flying at the Agricultural Show in July, and voting will be open to the public then.

We want, however, to give people a chance to see the designs before then, so we have put them up in colour on our website http://tireeflag.com.

Surprisingly for something so simple, you need to look at a flag for a long time to really appreciate it. The committee really appreciates the time and effort put into the competition by those who entered: they all contributed to the success of the project. Now over to you!

New community land management scheme launched

Crown Estate Scotland has opened up coastline, seabed and rural estates for local management under a new scheme launched 20th June.

The Local Pilots Scheme enables community bodies and local authorities to take on land and property to test new and innovative ways of sustainable development.

Scottish Crown Estate assets include seabed, just under half of Scotland’s foreshore and 37,000 ha of rural land across four estates. These are home to moorings, pontoons, fish farms, agricultural farms and much more.

The scheme is an opportunity for organisations around Scotland, whether a small development trust or a local authority, to develop project proposals designed to improve the economic, social and environmental well-being of their local area using eligible Scottish Crown Estate assets. Cabinet Secretary for the Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform, Roseanna Cunningham MSP said:

“This pilot scheme paves the way for local authorities and local communities to actively manage land, coastline or seabed in a way that directly benefits communities, but also Scotland as a whole by, for example, promoting sustainable development. “Crown Estate Scotland has a wealth of expertise to share with local authorities and communities, and I look forward to seeing organisations develop and shape their proposed projects. Small changes at a local level can have a big impact on a community – this scheme creates some really exciting opportunities.”

Projects that enhance economic, social, environmental and well-being outcomes are welcome, and the type of agreement and project can vary according to what suits the applicant and the type of asset it relates to. Crown Estate Scotland Chief Executive, Simon Hodge, said:

“Connections to the land and the sea run deep in Scotland, and we really want to involve local people in managing Scottish Crown Estate assets. We’ve designed this scheme, with valuable input from a wide range of organisations. It provides a great opportunity for communities and local authorities who have ideas about how they can use Scottish Crown Estate to enhance sustainable development. “We’re really keen to hear of innovative proposals that have the support of local people and existing tenants. If you have an idea, please come and speak to us. “Whatever the project, our staff will work with applicants, helping them to develop their plans. We see this scheme as a collaboration – not just between ourselves and the applicant – but also involving other interest groups who can contribute to the project’s success and potentially widen the benefits.”

Successful applicants who go on to develop their proposed project may receive appropriate remuneration which will cover their expenses, and can, with agreement from Crown Estate Scotland, reinvest capital raised within the project. The balance of the revenue will be paid to Crown Estate Scotland which, in turn, is given to the Scottish Government to contribute to public spending.

Projects must maintain and enhance the capital value of the estate and the interests of existing tenants and other users of the estate must be protected. The Stage One Application process is open until August 16 2018. Crown Estate Scotland encourages any interested group to get in touch and discuss details of their plans. Once applications are in, they will be assessed for eligibility. Viable projects will then progress to Stage Two application when applicants will develop and submit their business plans to meet the criteria. Again, an assessment phase will follow.

Scottish Ministers will approve the final selected projects.

New Tiree Community Council Takes Office

A new-look Community Council for the island formally took over last week at their first meeting, chaired by Tricia O’Neill, Argyll and Bute Council’s Central Governance Officer. Dr John Holliday (the new convenor), Robert Trythall (secretary), William Angus MacLean (vice-convenor),Andy Wright (treasurer) and Donna MacLean take over from the previous council. Sadly, Emma Rossiter has had to hand in her resignation because of family circumstances.

After the council had been set up, discussions moved onto the issues of the day. Chief amongst these was the difficulty resulting from the damage to the Clansman,which had meant a return for the smaller Lord of the Isles. This had been unable to cope with the surge in traffic over Easter and at the May bank holiday, but the biggest problem had been the online booking system, which proved far too inflexible to cope with the disruption.Many people had their travel plans affected. Businesses relying on visitors are likely to have taken a big hit. We have already written to the Cal-Mac management about this, but it must not be allowed to happen again and we will press hard on this issue.

The previous council had been inundated with complaints about the lack of reduced-fare tickets on Loganair flights to Glasgow. Roy Bogle has replied for the company. He effectively said that Loganair was facing big hikes in costs from airports and for fuel. To compensate, no further cut-price fares were being offered during the busier summer months. To be fair, Loganair’s contract with the Scottish Government does not compel them to offer discount fares, but the company has been selling some tickets at a cheaper rate to encourage people to travel. This contract is up for renewal next autumn, but the community council will begin negotiations with Transport Scotland in a few months time, and we will do our best to ensure reduced fares are back on the table.

The other big issue was the future of the Scarinish public toilets. Argyll and Bute Council have, in the past, threatened to close them, and the buildings were getting pretty run-down. As the only public toilets on the island, it is obvious that they are a fundamental part of our infrastructure.

The question is: should the island try to take them over, or should we fight to get the Council to put in some much-needed investment? This is rapidly becoming one of our top priorities, and we will work on this over the next few weeks. We are now down to five members, and we are going to ask two people to join the council. Rules for this have now been relaxed, and co-opted councillors are able to sit for two years.

We want to be as open as we can, and, with several tech-savvy new members, we hope that our website, Facebook and Twitter feeds can be developed. Our next meeting will be at the end of June. Let us know if there are issues you think we can help with (contact our new secretary Robert Trythall on rob@tireecommunitycouncil.co.uk).

Dr John Holliday (doc.holliday@tireecommunitycouncil.co.uk)

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