Tag Archives: beach erosion

Tiree Ranger Service News

Sun, Sea and… Soil?

I would like to extend my warmest thanks to the community members who volunteered their time, tools and energy to overhaul the Balevullin parking area. The work was completed on a beautifully bright day, with an abundance of biscuits and good humour. The erosion pits have been filled and levelled, and the rope boundary has been moved inward from the steeply sloping section. A number of vehicles rolled down onto the beach this year. Fortunately, no one was injured (and how grateful we are for that) but this is obviously extremely dangerous. For safety reasons, the parking area has been re-marked to reduce the risk of this happening again. The posts to be extracted had the hallmark of Steve Nagy quality; whereby, like icebergs, only 10% is visible at the surface (the other 90% being set in dry cement, and practically scraping Australia). Rob Trythall reigned champion as the fastest post-digger in the west; setting most of our new boundary within the hour. John Bowler then had the opportunity to re-visit his trusty Cub Scout knot, and is likely still fiddling with it as we speak. I’m not 100% clear on whether the ‘rabbit’ goes up the tree or into the pond: Suspect John isn’t either… A huge ‘Thank You’ is also due to Lachie Brown, who very kindly transported the soil into the parking area for us – cutting down some serious wheelbarrow miles. Lachie’s help made an enormous difference to the logistics of completing this job, and allowed us to finish the task in one sitting. As the repairs establish themselves, can I ask that users avoid driving over them where possible. For the winter period, the space on the opposite side of the graveled track within the parking area should be sufficient for most occasions. With kind wishes and thanks again to all those who gave up their time; I am extremely grateful.

Tiree Access Forum

The Tiree Access Forum is made up of individuals from a range of different organisations and backgrounds. Those represented currently include: Argyll & Bute Council, Argyll Estates, Discover Tiree, island business owners, RSPB, SNH, TCDT, TRD, Tiree Ranger Service and local watersports operators/participants.

To ensure that the access forum remains representative of our community (and the cross-section of different viewpoints and interests within it) I would like to reiterate that this group is open to all. Please contact me on: ranger{@}tireetrust.org.uk if:

• You can attend our meetings reasonably regularly

• You are interested in access issues on Tiree

• You would like to find out more about how these issues are discussed

• You would like to share your own thoughts and ideas

• You would like to help steer access outcomes

We meet once a month; normally on a Thursday evening, between 19:30 and 21:30. If you cannot commit to regular meetings, I am happy to discuss access queries by email, telephone (074) or in person. I can then raise these matters for discussion at the next session. Remember: we cannot discuss concerns that aren’t raised. There are also many different viewpoints, interests and considerations to balance between different agencies and users.

With thanks and warm wishes to all, Stephanie.

Tiree Ranger Service – Winter Storms and Tidal Surges

beach_erosionThe tourist season is almost with us. Yes it is March already and the Easter Holidays are only a few weeks away. What will they find when they arrive?

I guess we are all fed up with the wind and rain that seems to have plagued us incessantly since November and have left the machair a flooded quagmire. Along with this winter storms and tidal surges have devastated the dune systems around the island. It is roughly estimated that the equivalent of three to four years normal erosion has taken place in the matter of a few months. It will take years for the damage to rectify naturally, but we can all help to prevent further damage.

Some areas of dunes are no doubt unstable and in some areas war time materials have been unearthed. Both of these pose a potential for accident and potential injury. So what can you do to help?

  • ?Be careful where you walk – try to avoid dune edges and exposed wartime material
  • ?Watch where you park. Stay back from the dune edge which may be undercut and likely to collapse
  • ?Try not to access beaches by walking down dune fronts but by using established tracks
  • ? If accessing beaches with vehicles please use tracks that are already established
  • ?If you are crofting and need sand/shingle please take this from as close to the sea as possible rather than at dune fronts or behind dunes to give dunes a chance to re-establish themselves
  • ?If you have friends or visitors coming to the island in the next few months please ask them to follow the advice given above.

The devastating erosion to Tiree’s dune systems has been raised with Scottish Natural Heritage and Argyll & Bute Council to see what, if any, actions we can take to protect and prevent further damage to our dunes. I will keep you informed in future editions of An’Tirisdeach of how this progresses. Above are pictures of Crossapol in December and March, which show the stark differences from before and after the storms.